Tag Archives: lesson planning

50 Years: Civil Rights in America

Concerned about the Lies Your History Teacher Told You?!

The plight of Martin Luther King Jr. and his nonviolent struggle are not some of them…

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This week marks the 50th anniversary of the 16th Street Birmingham Church Bombing in Alabama, 1963.  During this extremist act, four innocent girls and two boys were killed during the bombing of a church known for housing members of the Civil Rights Movement.

Hauntingly enough, President Barack Obama addressed the American people this week regarding a possible strike on the Syrian government for unleashing chemical weapons on its people, a tragic event that also snatched the lives of  innocent women and children for no reason other than perverting power.

No matter the time, no matter the circumstance:  ONE life lost is one too many…

But nevertheless, here we are.  Collectively pondering the value of life as members of a global society are sacrificed in both the past and present.

I dedicate today’s post to the many innocent lives that have been lost in the name of DEMOCRACY & FREEDOM or the lack thereof.  

Lesson Plan Inspired As a Result?  

imagesI came across a super cool clip concerning Martin Luther King’s ‘Dream,’ as we continue to ask,: has it been realized…not just on a national scale, but also, internationally?

First, View…

While students view the clip, ask them to complete the following handout as a source of notes…

If you are a member of the Upfront community, I challenge you to make the teaching world a better place…just as MLK did for social rights, do so for educational progress…how can YOU leave your MARK?  What will YOU contribute to your legacy?

Scour the MEDIA world; find a valuable–perhaps timelessCLIP (so we can use it year after year!) and develop a HANDOUT to correspond!

Several colleagues have expressed interest in contributing to the GP curriculum.  Here’s your chance!  ANY professional can do this.  You don’t need to be a ‘seasoned’ (whatever that means) GP teacher to contribute!

Let’s collaborate by adding to this bank of timeless, valuable materials-in-the-making!  

EMAIL YOUR SHARABLE MATERIALS to edupavich@yahoo.com and I’ll showcase them in a post dedicated to YOU, and your HARD WORK!!  

SHARE…I double-dog DARE you 😉

Collaboratively Yours,

eduPavich

Hot Seat: Summer Sizzle Activity

As faithful followers of the news, we know the 2013 summer headlines…but how do we teach them?!

Wildfires devastate the West in 2013.  The burning of Yosemite National Park threatens nearby water sources, including the Hetch Hetchy Resevoir in CA.

SUMMER SIZZLE:  Wildfires devastate the West in 2013. The blaze in Yosemite National Park threatens nearby water sources, including CA’s Hetch Hetchy Resevoir.

Here are a few renditions of the “Hot Seat” I explored in each of my classes yesterday as we informally chatted about the summer’s news.  Feel free to chime in with different ways you approach current events discussions/ideas-sharing/student engagement with your teen population…we’d love to hear a variety of these approaches for use on future current events projects!

  • LOW TEMPERATURE…Try the “Boy v. Girl” Game-Style Challenge…inspired by my fellow colleague (props to Ms. Lisa Maultasch!), I split the class into boys versus girls.  I wrote each of the ‘Hot Seat: Summer Sizzle’ issues on index cards to start.  If it was the girls’ turn to go, they would send a representative up to sit in the Seat.  That girl would select a card, doing her best to give “sufficient” evidence of her understanding on the topic.  If she could not, the floor would be given to the boys’ team, who would collaborate as one, collective voice to determine a proper response.  Any boy arguecould then step up as the spokesperson to relay the answer.  If they were correct in their knowledge of the issue, the boys got to take the index card from the Hot Seater girl who could not provide sufficient enough input.  Then, this same scenario happened in reverse: a boy would approach the Hot Seat individually; if he could not provide sufficient knowledge on the selected summer headline, the girls could formulate a response collectively and the best team won the index card.  Tally up the cards won at the end, and voila!  Credit, extra credit, homework passes, participation points, or what-have-you in the way of incentives.  More importantly, a baseline awareness was created regarding local, national, and international news.
  • MEDIUM TEMPERATURE…Try the “Groups” approach…students organize into teams of 4.  The Summer Sizzle Headlines are hanging via index card on the board.  First, groups discussed what they know and/or what they learned via interview about the headlined topics.  Then, as a group, they determine THREE issues they’d like to present to the class when in the Hot Seat.  (It’s amazing how a single group might pick all environmental issues, or all political issues, or all entertainment issues…showing interest in and paying automatic tribute to the General Paper THEMES without even realizing it!).  Put groups in the Hot Seat and have them ‘school’ the class on the issues they chose while audience members draft one-sentence summaries in their notes for each of the issues discussed.
  • HOT, HOT HEAT!…Try the true-to-form, HOT Seat…students elect to approach the Hot Seat on their own accord; they are there individually, as opposed to group support.  Since it’s the beginning of the year, I allow them to pick the Summer Headline they are most comfortable with to discuss.  They begin by explaining the issue in its obvious form
    Local, National, and International Perspectives...such are the joys of GP!

    Local, National, and International Perspectives…such are the joys of GP!

    (expository practice!).

Once they finish up their basic summary, however, I bring the heat: I delve deeper into the issue by asking them questions that span beyond the obvious.  Specifically, I encourage students to look at a single issue from a variety of lenses (political, environmental, social, etc.), and from multiple levels (local, national, international).

Want to know what I mean by this rather abstract bit of advice?!  Well, you’re in luck because I love a good model…

But, patience is a virtue!  Take the extra time to observe the dialogue string below, which models HOW to probe students on the issues, and how to guide them toward GP connections:

So GP Student A walks into the classroom…

Teacher:  Student A, what issue do you elect to explore?

Student A:  I’d like to talk about the recent WILDFIRES occurring in the U.S.

Teacher:  Ok, super!  Tell me everything you know.

Student A:  Well, there are lots of wildfires breaking out in dry states in the West like in Arizona, and California, particularly near important landmarks like Yosemite National Park in the Sierra mountain-chain region.  There was also the Beaver Creek fire in Idaho, I think it was.

Teacher:  So how does this impact us on a national level?

Student A:  Basically it destroys our environment.  Like, when the wildfires hit places like Yosemite, it’s destroying entire habitats and animals and plants unique to this environment.  My mom mentioned the Sequoias native to the region.  Also, I remember reading that the wildfires are posing a threat to the water supplies in California and the Bay Area.  Since water is our most basic and essential need, if we don’t have it–well–people in this area could die.

Teacher:  Wow, amazing observations about the wildfire’s impact on our environment.  Points earned for knowing your stuff!

Student A:  Whew!  Awesome!  (smiles, and relief at surviving the Hot Seat)

Teacher:  But wait a minute, let me approach the same topic from a different angle for a minute…

Student A: (uh-ooooh-face)…

Teacher:  It makes sense that the wildfires are destroying our environment, but how might they be hurting our economy?  Consider that for a minute.  Take your time and think about the connection between fire and $$$$…

Student A: (puzzled face, followed by light-bulb)…oh, wait, yeah…soooo…if the wildfires destroy parks like Yosemite, it hurts the imageseconomy because then tourists don’t get to visit this site, which is pretty popular otherwise.  If the fires destroy what there is to see, no one is going to come to visit it.  Our economy takes a hit because that means less tourists spending money there, whether it be on food or hotel or admission tickets.

Teacher:  Brilliant connections made between wildfires and our economy.  Ok, now that we have a foundation of knowledge, let’s talk about how it can be woven into a GP essay.  In essence, what is the “GP Relevance” of this information we’ve studied?  Well, there are lots of SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY prompts on the GP exam.  A lot of the times, Section 2 of the GP exam will ask you to write essays that cater to the following style of essay prompt:  To what extent can we rely on modern technology to control otherwise unpredictable events? So, Student A, let me ask you this…is it possible to beat Mother Nature with modern tools, i.e  Technology VERSUS Earth, Air/Wind, Fire, Water…?

Student A:  Yeah…totally…I mean, we can use technology to fix pretty much anything today.

Teacher:  Prove it 😉

Student A:  Ummm…well, hmmm…like hurricanes, we can tell when a hurricane is coming.  That’d be technology trumping an unpredictable event, right?!

Teacher:  That’s definitely a start, Student A, but you seem unsure.  Let’s put our heads together to make sure.  Audience, what do you think?  To what extent can technology control unpredictable events like natural disasters?

Audience 1:  Oooh, I know.  Like how Student A said, when it’s a hurricane, we can use technology to predict the path of the hurricane before it harms us.  We have the option to evacuate in advance.  A couple of years ago, during Hurricane Willow, my family and I drove north to my Grandma’s in Tallahassee to avoid the storm.  We boarded up and left.  

Teacher:  Good point.  Technology is definitely a friend to us in Florida, where we are hurricane-prone.

Audience 2:  Yeah but in other parts of the U.S., natural disasters like tornadoes aren’t as easy to predict no matter what technology we have available to us.  Sometimes natural disasters just kind of drop out of the sky without warning.

Teacher:  A valid argument, but where–SPECIFICALLY–have we seen this?  Can you provide a concrete example to further support your logic?

Audience 3:  I know!  How about the Moore, Oklahoma, issue from the summer…didn’t they have, like 10 minutes to evacuate, or something like that?

Teacher:  16.  They had 16 minutes.  Props for the concrete support, (Audience 3)!

Audience 4:  Well what about the sinkholes we looked up?  You don’t even get a minute’s warning on that one.  The one that happened in Orlando came out of nowhere!  One minute you’re standing there, and the next…well, the earth gives way and just kind of swallows you up…

Florida Sinkhole Threat 2013

Florida Sinkhole Threat 2013

Audience 5:  My family and I go to Orlando every year for New Year’s…

Audience 1:  Yeah, so that’s GP relevance on the LOCAL level, right?!

Teacher:  Exactly.  So you’d agree that sometimes we can predict and prevent Mother Nature’s wrath whereas other times we cannot…

Audience 3:  Yes, it just depends on where you are and which natural disaster your area is prone to.

Audience 4:  Yeah, it’s based on the circumstances.

Teacher (smiles)…thinks to self: ‘mission accomplished….’

This is the best case scenario because students are listening to one another and benefiting from each other’s contributions.  Listening to one another probes further thought.  The teacher takes a back-seat, merely guiding, as the conversation unfolds.  The students draw upon the task that was their homework to fuel the challenge that is their classwork.  The highest levels of critical thinking are tested as they discuss the issue together!

What else can you do to immerse your students in the headlines of summer?  Submit your experiences here!  Who wouldn’t benefit from a fresh approach to common practice?!  Pay it Forward!

Collaboratively Yours,

eduPavich

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